News

Indonesian recognition for Riverland Pest Free Area

Friday 2 December 2016

In a huge boost for the State’s Riverland, the Indonesian Government has formally recognised it as a Pest Free Area (PFA).


The recognition follows an audit on the State’s fruit fly management system conducted by Indonesia earlier this year.

It also follows China’s decision in May to recognise the Riverland as a PFA for the export of nectarines.

Other export markets that currently recognise the Riverland PFA include the United States, Thailand, Japan and New Zealand.  

Quotes attributable to Minister for Agriculture, Food and Fisheries Leon Bignell

Today’s news is a brilliant boost for the State’s Riverland.   There is no doubt this new status will provide great opportunities for the Riverland fruit industry to expand – which means more jobs in the region.

I want to thank the Deputy Prime Minister Barnaby Joyce and Senator Anne Ruston, with whom we have worked closely, along with the industry in the Riverland, who have done a terrific job. I would also like to thank the team at Biosecurity South Australia who are up there working very hard with all of the growers.

The State Government spends $5 million a year on maintaining -  and promoting  - our fruit-fly free status. It is not always easy and it takes a long time to convince overseas markets.

The South Australian exports to Indonesia in terms of citrus are 2,500 tonnes a year, split evenly between oranges and mandarins. Seventy-eight tonnes of Australian stone fruit such as nectarines, peaches, plums and apricots are exported to Indonesia, and the market is growing. There is no doubt this new status and recognition will really help us.

We have a proud tradition in South Australia of producing premium food and wine and this latest development will mean even more opportunities for our State. I would like to express my thanks to the Indonesian Government for its hard work and we look forward to building a stronger relationship between South Australia and Indonesia.

Quotes attributable to Assistant Minister for Agriculture and Water Resources Anne Ruston

This latest recognition of the Riverland PFA by the Indonesian Government is great news for the region and local horticulture industry.

Australia and Indonesia share a mutually beneficial relationship and have a long history of agricultural cooperation.

Australia’s $9 billion horticulture industry is Australia’s third largest agricultural industry and operates in a highly competitive market, both domestically and internationally.

Our farmers are renowned for their resilience and ability to grow safe, premium produce and this recognition rewards good biosecurity practices and will give growers from the region a competitive edge.

Background

Every year the State Government spends about $5 million keeping fruit fly and other plant pests out of the state, through a range of prevention, detection and eradication measures undertaken by Biosecurity SA, a division of the Department of Primary Industries and Regions SA (PIRSA).

In 2014–15, the estimated farm-gate value of the state’s horticultural produce vulnerable to fruit fly infestation – including wine grapes and almonds - was $1.1 billion. Indonesian recognition for Riverland Pest Free Area

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Media Contacts

Kate Husband - Communications Manager, Primary Industries
Email: Kate.Husband@sa.gov.au
Phone: 0423 296 579

Celia Brissenden - Communications Manager, Regional Development
Email: celia.brissenden@sa.gov.au


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