News

Desert dogs destined for desexing

Monday 1 July 2019

A trial Animal Health Program which is helping protect domestic dogs and address a wild dog problem at an Aboriginal community near Ceduna will continue thanks to State Government support.


Minister for Primary Industries and Regional Development Tim Whetstone visited Koonibba Aboriginal community, near Ceduna, where a trial Animal Health Program is desexing community dogs to help reduce the impacts of wild dogs.

With funding from both State and Federal governments, not-for-profit Animal Management in Rural and Remote Indigenous Communities (AMRRIC) is delivering the trial program for a second time, after the community widely applauded the first round last year.

Minister Whetstone said the State Government was pleased to contribute to a program that clearly achieved results for the Koonibba community and local pastoralists.

“Wild dogs are an ongoing problem for the sheep farmers adjacent to the Koonibba Aboriginal community and producers will be pleased to learn that this program is continuing,” said Minister Whetstone.

“We know there are more dogs in the community that still need to be desexed, and program leaders expect community members will be increasingly forthcoming as they see dogs recovering well from the desexing process.”

Member for Flinders Peter Treloar praised the work of the Koonibba community in helping to address the problem of wild dogs.

“Wild dogs are an on-going problem for local pastoralists and the desexing program at Koonibba is just one of the measures the State Government is implementing to reduce the impact on the state’s livestock industry,” said Mr Treloar.

Koonibba Community Aboriginal Corporation Chief Executive Officer Corey McLennan thanked the veterinarians and local environmental health workers for their professional approach in coordinating and conducting a service much needed by the community.

“It was a great effort, which should be highly applauded and replicated more frequently as the demand from our community warrants this most valuable and professional service,” said Mr McLennan.

The dog desexing program is part of a suite of State Government measures to reduce the severe impact wild dogs have on the State’s livestock industry.

The State Government’s 2019-20 State Budget also delivers $25 million funding to upgrade the 100-year-old dog fence, which primary producers have long-identified as a key piece of infrastructure to protect our livestock industry.

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